Author Topic: ATX Power Supply Breakout Board  (Read 3386 times)

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GreekMan

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ATX Power Supply Breakout Board
« on: June 27, 2016, 01:24:24 AM »
just found this...
I can tell that it is a custo PCB board to split out the  power froman ATX power supluy

http://blog.curioussystem.com/2010/10/atx-power-supply-breakout-board/

Tevin

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Re: ATX Power Supply Breakout Board
« Reply #1 on: June 27, 2016, 07:11:05 AM »
just found this...
I can tell that it is a custo PCB board to split out the  power froman ATX power supluy

http://blog.curioussystem.com/2010/10/atx-power-supply-breakout-board/

The link is several years old, but it is a VERY clever idea!

Desktop computer power supplies are super-cheap, sometimes free, and put out a few hundred watts of very clean & stable DC.

Great find, Greek!


AD

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Re: ATX Power Supply Breakout Board
« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2016, 10:02:32 AM »
GM

Here is a link to a "buy and use" cheap computer supply that is not in a ATX formated case.

http://www.preparedham.com/cheap-and-dependable-acdc-radio-power-supply/
The only dumb question is the one that did not get asked!!

Flight-ER-Doc

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Re: ATX Power Supply Breakout Board
« Reply #3 on: June 27, 2016, 10:15:13 AM »
I must be missing the point.

Yes, you can use a computer power supply for radios..I have one powering an aircraft radio (King Kx150) in a portable case, used for Search and Rescue...

What does the board do that you cannot just figure out with a voltmeter?  Find the pins you need, use them?

GreekMan

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Re: ATX Power Supply Breakout Board
« Reply #4 on: June 28, 2016, 06:37:26 AM »
from what I see it works as a various connectors and voltage distribution box.
hey! it is a DIY project! some things are done just because.

personally I already have an ATX supply.So...

Flight-ER-Doc

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Re: ATX Power Supply Breakout Board
« Reply #5 on: June 28, 2016, 10:33:21 AM »
OK, a solution in search of a problem....

Tevin

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Re: ATX Power Supply Breakout Board
« Reply #6 on: June 28, 2016, 05:10:32 PM »
I must be missing the point.

Yes, you can use a computer power supply for radios..I have one powering an aircraft radio (King Kx150) in a portable case, used for Search and Rescue...

What does the board do that you cannot just figure out with a voltmeter?  Find the pins you need, use them?

I thought the same thing at first. And I will admit the linked project is probably more complicated than it needs to be.

However, it's not quite as simple as using a voltmeter or looking up the pin-outs on line. ATX supplies need to receive a "power good" signal from the motherboard before they (the power supply) will fully engage. At the very least, you would have to figure out how to disable this function.

 

GreekMan

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Re: ATX Power Supply Breakout Board
« Reply #7 on: June 30, 2016, 01:04:45 AM »
Also in another forum I was told they need soem load to operate. That man was using a resistor, but a small USb light also does the job.

Tevin, is that what you are talking of?

Tevin

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Re: ATX Power Supply Breakout Board
« Reply #8 on: June 30, 2016, 05:58:29 PM »
Also in another forum I was told they need soem load to operate. That man was using a resistor, but a small USb light also does the job.

Tevin, is that what you are talking of?

There is a feature on ATX motherboards that monitors the power supply and will not allow the computer to turn on until it sees a steady voltage. Once the motherboard sees an acceptable power source, it generates a "power good" signal and the computer proceeds to boot up.

Power supplies need a few milliseconds to charge up their filter capacitors and stabilize their outputs, so the computer will wait until it sees something it likes. This feature is more related to the motherboard than the power supply, but you still have to take it into account when using a computer power supply for other stuff.