Author Topic: Where can newcomers operate digital modes?  (Read 11295 times)

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WA4STO

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Where can newcomers operate digital modes?
« on: February 11, 2012, 02:01:27 PM »
The Prepared Ham newcomer should seriously consider using what we tend to call "digital" modes.

Why?  I'll create another topic to explain that in this category.  This topic is designed to alert the digital newcomer to the fact that we've crafted the Amateur Radio Service regulations to allow for a huge number of frequencies that you can operate "digital" on.

By clicking on this link, you'll be presented with a graphic that shows most of the frequencies that we can use.

http://www.arrl.org/images/view//Regulatory_/Band_Chart_Feb_3_2012.jpg

Assuming that you're just starting out and would likely be getting the Technician class license, you should be looking for the portions of the graphic that show a "T" or even a "N, T". 

For example, look at the "6 meter 50 mHz" area.  There, you'll see that "T", meaning that even the beginner has access.  But, there's a couple of things that are not so obvious about 6 meters:

1.  By passing your Tech exam, we grant you the use of a bajillion frequencies on 6 meters.

2.  By passing your Tech exam, we grant you access to a large number of modes.  And -- you guessed it -- lots and lots of digital modes as well.

There's a couple of other interesting things about six meters.  For one, the area around 50 mHz (any of you not - yet - licensed folks, know why the "H" in mHz is always capitalized?) supports some of the digital modes that are utilized for "meteor scatter", or the use of ionized meteor trails (or aircraft for that matter!) as a means of bouncing your signals back to earth.  Secondly, this area of the frequency spectrum -- loaned to you for your use, just by having passed that pesky little exam! -- is as free and clear of interference as you could possibly hope for.  For many of us, six is the greatest band.

Ah, but then, there's ten meters.  Look for it on the frequency chart, above.  Ten is very very close to the CB frequencies and, as such, shares the same kind of propagation.  In other words, sometimes it's world-wide in nature and at other times, it's akin to a door nail; deader'n one. 

For me, personally, ten meters is King of 'em all.  I've worked thousands of stations all over the world, using many many different modes. 

And, as on six meters, we offer the Technician a gigantic chunk of spectrum on 10, as well as almost all of the digital modes.  And since the sun (and its much-aligned eruptions) is being very very kind to us this year, it's a fabulous time to put your efforts into 10 meters. 

Oh, and one last thing about 10.  A dipole antenna for 10 meters is about 16 feet long (eight feet on each side of the insulator) which is SO easy to do...

More to follow!  Questions?  Count on answers.

73 de "Luck" WA4STO
Wilber, Nebraska


PSK31 Olivia Packet AX.25 MFSK-64 CLOVER Amtor Gtor Pactor, Domino-EX. NBEMS, Feld Hell, Contestia [/color/

DSB

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Re: Where can newcomers operate digital modes?
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2012, 02:08:32 PM »
Thanks Wilber,
Not only the newbies need instruction on digital. I just got my Signalink USB in a few days ago and I have reserved next weekend to load up winmore. I have heard getting everything in sync is not always an easy task, but digital is definitely something to have in our bag of emergency preparedness tricks. So get ready to get intellectually probed by those of us who get that "deer in the headlights" look when our computers refuse to respond to our wishes. Thanks and welcome to our site. We all need the input!
David
« Last Edit: February 11, 2012, 02:10:44 PM by DSB »
DSB

idial1911

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Re: Where can newcomers operate digital modes?
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2012, 02:16:07 PM »
Thanks Wilber,
Not only the newbies need instruction on digital. I just got my Signalink USB in a few days ago and I have reserved next weekend to load up winmore. I have heard getting everything in sync is not always an easy task, but digital is definitely something to have in our bag of emergency preparedness tricks. So get ready to get intellectually probed by those of us who get that "deer in the headlights" look when our computers refuse to respond to our wishes. Thanks and welcome to our site. We all need the input!
David

When you get plugged in let me know.. I understand digital mode pretty good.. I can remote into your computer and look at what you are doing while you are doing it.
The more I learn, the less I know.

DSB

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Re: Where can newcomers operate digital modes?
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2012, 02:42:29 PM »
Outstanding!
People seem to be having enough trouble with winmore that they have an entire Yahoo Group on the subject. Being able to tag team with you makes me dread it alot less LOL...Thank you!
DSB

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Re: Where can newcomers operate digital modes?
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2012, 02:57:49 PM »
Dont let him remote into your system david!  The last guy he did that to ended up with a hard drive full of petting zoo porn  :o
The only dumb question is the one that did not get asked!!

idial1911

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Re: Where can newcomers operate digital modes?
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2012, 03:02:25 PM »
Dont let him remote into your system david!  The last guy he did that to ended up with a hard drive full of petting zoo porn  :o

You mean the petting zoo porn i got off your machine?? Just because you put it all in a directory called "nothing here" doesn't mean it's going to fool anyone.
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idial1911

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Re: Where can newcomers operate digital modes?
« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2012, 03:05:35 PM »
Outstanding!
People seem to be having enough trouble with winmore that they have an entire Yahoo Group on the subject. Being able to tag team with you makes me dread it alot less LOL...Thank you!

A few hard and fast rules..

1) double check the jumpers in signal link are right
2) the ALC shouldn't move when you transmit
3) Inside winmor there is a setting to see the RX levels.. It should be around 50% you can adjust it on your radio the regular volume level, and for finer adjustments on the signal link box.
4) Turn compression off

some people are turning off NB and NR.. I didn't have to but some recommend it. Those items get you most of the way there.
The more I learn, the less I know.

DSB

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Re: Where can newcomers operate digital modes?
« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2012, 03:10:24 PM »
Uhhhh... I already have the petting zoo porn site on my favorites. AD sent the link to me when he was in Vegas... you know, what goes on in Vegas, stays in Vegas... I didnt want to press him about his personal interface w/ said porn site, I figgered I'd leave that to Mrs Armordudette.

Quote
A few hard and fast rules..

1) double check the jumpers in signal link are right
2) the ALC shouldn't move when you transmit
3) Inside winmor there is a setting to see the RX levels.. It should be around 50% you can adjust it on your radio the regular volume level, and for finer adjustments on the signal link box.
4) Turn compression off

some people are turning off NB and NR.. I didn't have to but some recommend it. Those items get you most of the way there.

Thnx for the info!
« Last Edit: February 11, 2012, 04:49:38 PM by DSB »
DSB

Etech

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Re: Where can newcomers operate digital modes?
« Reply #8 on: April 02, 2012, 04:45:48 PM »
Good points for the newcomers and old timers alike!

If you'd care to try one day would love to see how well 10m digi could work between us. My QTH is KC metro. Would have interest in JT65, that mode really digs into the noise!!! Please do let me know, possibly might get others even further south to try also.

73 Larry

WA4STO

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SHTF Link, Nebraska <-> K.C.
« Reply #9 on: April 03, 2012, 10:13:07 AM »
Larry - yes we're about 170-ish miles from each other.  Which makes it (at least to my failing mind) an interesting possibility for the gathering of data post-SHTF.

Problem is, of course, ten meter success could never imply that we'd be able to do it on a reliable basis, post-SHTF or even during trial sessions.

This morning, I see that 28.076 is deader'n'adoornail. 

Personally, I find that Winmore, Winlink and possibily NBEMS would be fabulous, since they scan the various bands.  Some can even predict (based on propagation stats) the likliest frequency band to be successful from point A to point B and beyond.  That way, we wouldn't be sitting on 15 meters waiting for a good day, when - wait! lookie there! -- 40 meters is just screaming hot.  Let's (automatically) go there.

My how things have changed in the wunnerful world of hamateur radio.

Etech

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Re: SHTF Link, Nebraska <-> K.C.
« Reply #10 on: April 03, 2012, 03:26:08 PM »
Well right you were, could not hear you at all, but did hear the Argentina station working you  :D

I'd encourage those just starting (Tech) to get active with digital. JT65 is really amazing - 28.076 MHz also PSK on/around 28.120 MHz.

Larry - yes we're about 170-ish miles from each other.  Which makes it (at least to my failing mind) an interesting possibility for the gathering of data post-SHTF.

Problem is, of course, ten meter success could never imply that we'd be able to do it on a reliable basis, post-SHTF or even during trial sessions.

This morning, I see that 28.076 is deader'n'adoornail. 

Personally, I find that Winmore, Winlink and possibily NBEMS would be fabulous, since they scan the various bands.  Some can even predict (based on propagation stats) the likliest frequency band to be successful from point A to point B and beyond.  That way, we wouldn't be sitting on 15 meters waiting for a good day, when - wait! lookie there! -- 40 meters is just screaming hot.  Let's (automatically) go there.

My how things have changed in the wunnerful world of hamateur radio.